A day at the market

 

Since I left my hometown I have naturally absorbed the big city’s habits and made the urban routine mine. Even more so when I moved to Copenhagen: the cold modern hub in the north. One of these habits is buying food at the supermarket where everything is selected, packed and wrapped; you don’t even need to have any interaction with other people.
So when I had a walk at the daily market during my Christmas holidays in south of Italy, I felt a bit like a tourist. I had forgotten about all the different colours, noises and perfumes. The genuine feeling of buying fresh fish, still alive. The farmers offering you a taste of fruit. The smell of the cheese stalls. The sacks of local almonds. The boys yelling. How much per kilo. Counting your coins.
I returned back home with plenty of photos and a bag full of mussels and clams.
What a great meal we had.

Photo reportage: abandoned airport

Yesterday I joined François, the ultimate Copenhagen Urban Explorer, in one of his tours: we biked to the abandoned military airport near Værløse, 20 km northwest of Copenhagen. 
We had a stroll among the remains of the glorious Danish air force, stepping cautiously on broken glasses and rotten beams.
I took some photos to show you how time has turned the site into a powerful image of vandalism.

Why weddings?

When you start in photography they all tell you the same thing: you have to find your sub-category, since you can’t do everything in the huge photography world. 
For me it was imperative to take pictures of people, somehow: no matter whether it was fashion, weddings or corporate photography, I need to interact with people, or I would get immediately bored.
There is only one sub-category in the immense photography field where you can experience so many different kinds of emotion: weddings. 
Because it’s your stories.

CPH Fashion Week

"Fashion is one of the most beautiful forms of art we have. It’s a form of art that every person gets to possess and create for themselves” Jim James

Twice a year Copenhagen hosts the Copenhagen Fashion Week, the largest fashion event in the nordic countries. The city gets crowded with designers, models, buyers, press, and it turns into a runway. You can feel the excitement, the hectic energy, and the glamorous beauty.
I had never been an active part of the Copenhagen Fashion Week, but this year Nixonbui and I worked together on the catalogue of his Spring/Summer 17 collection.
Stay tuned if you wanna see more photos ;)

Come home soon, love

“I do love secondhand books that open to the page some previous owner read oftenest” Helene Hanff

In photography like in every other field there’s always something new to learn, and if you want to be a skilled photographer you’ll have to study and read and keep yourself updated.
I read lots of magazines and books about photography or about art in general.
I buy books in secondhand stores, not just because it’s cheaper and good for the environment, but also because I love to find signs of other human beings: reading pages someone else has turned, finding notes in the margins and flyleaves forgotten inside the book, reading passages someone else has underlined.
So the other day I was walking in Copenhagen and found a bookstall. Saw a book called “Criticizing photographs”, by Terry Barrett, and brought it home, left it on a shelf and forgot about it. This morning, I saw it and started turning its pages when I found this lovely note: “Come home soon, love”

Dust, mud and concrete

Safety helmets, boots and high visibility vests must be worn at all times.

I have always wondered about the mechanism behind things. You know that kid that always dissembles toys and objects to find out about the inner working? That was me.
So when one of the companies responsible for the new metro in Copenhagen asked me to go and take some pictures of the work in progress I couldn’t help it and said yes immediately. 
So I got some safety shoes, a high visibility jacket, a huge helmet and a course about safety. I had the chance to visit the site of Marmokirken, the deepest of the whole metro system with its 40m below sea level, and the most challenging one with its tracks one above each other, and not on each side of the platform, like all the other stations.
It was a very nice experience: after all, it doesn’t happen every day to go underground and see tunnels, platforms and tracks in the making. 
Despite the dust, the mud and the concrete all over me.

Fairy tales

“In the land that created fairy tales, we just started our own” 
Cit. Rufus Gifford

We all know it: Denmark was the first country in the world to allow gay couples to formalise their unions, in 1989. Today, most of the battles have been won here, and LGBT couples can have equal rights. They even have the blessing of the Danish Church.
I was born in a small catholic town in south of Italy, and after 4 years in Copenhagen it still feels amazing to have this freedom and acceptance. Working as a wedding photographer in Scandinavia I have seen that people look at gay weddings for what they really are: celebrating couples committed to one another. That’s it.
I must say, never in my life in Italy I would have imagined to experience this sense of inclusion, and also to be the one documenting it with my camera.
It really feels amazing to be part of it.

I've become a foodie

“Don’t marry someone who doesn’t love food, they won’t understand the pleasures of life”
Cit. my grandma

I love good food.
Let me say that again: I love good food.
I really believe that a great meal is an absolute pleasure, as much as sex.
That’s why restaurant photography and food related events are a big part of my portfolio.
Going to restaurants as a photographer, I noticed that I was getting to know new people, and that I had the chance to taste new things and new flavours, from all over the world. Quite easy in a cosmopolitan city like Copenhagen.
But food is not just about food. 
We often forget that the food culture is such a big part of our daily life: without food we can’t survive, and we’ve managed to make it a true pleasure. Not only that: food involves traditions, habits, values; it can be a symbol of social status and religious belief, and it can tell a lot about a community.
It’s so interesting that I’m getting hungry again.

Oh, by the way, I had the best ramen soup ever last weekend, you can check it out here.

Your stories

When thinking about wedding photography, people usually believe that it’s always the same routine, the same things, the same poses, the same photos.
Truth is, you’ll never get bored at weddings. There’s always something going on and every time you get to meet new people. Moments of joy and happiness are so natural that you don’t need to create the event, things are happening on their own. And everybody is part of the story: there’s so much more than the bride and the groom, and as a photographer you see everything, whereas the guests have eyes only for the newlyweds.
The emotions you get to photograph are not fake, people are truly happy and their smiles sincere.
And it’s a pleasure to take these photos.

Petit déjeuner

“The marvels of daily life are exciting: no movie director can arrange the unexpected that you find in the street” (Robert Doisneau)

Working as event photographer in Copenhagen I have had the pleasure of seeing parts of the city I had never been before. Among these, a former industrial site in the harbour, Refshaleøen. 
I was taking photos of a private reception at a beach bar called Halvandet. 
It was sunny and warm, and I was drinking a glass of iced water. Then I saw this scene and dropped my glass to take a picture of it: one of the waiters setting the table on the dock.
In a fraction of a second all the photos of Robert Doisneau were played in my mind, and I felt like being in France in the 30s.
But then I looked at the broken glass at my feet.
Yep.

Smile Viking, smile

Today I was having coffee in a cosy cafe in the middle of Copenhagen with a good friend of mine, talking about photography, when she suggested to start a blog, so that people could stay updated with my work.
I thought about it for a minute and decided to give it a shot.
So I wanna start by posting a portrait I took of her that I really love: and if you knew how difficult it is to make a tough viking-ish Norwegian smile, you'd love it too.