Miserere mei

Good Friday is the day catholics recall the crucifixion of Jesus Christ. All over the catholic world grief is commemorated with images of the cross, of the beaten body of Jesus and of the mourning Virgin. It’s the day of death.

Not far from where I was born there is a beautiful little town called Vico del Gargano. I arrived there at 8 in the morning, on Good Friday. 
Every year, on that day, at that time, the members of the five local brotherhoods wear their traditional robes and start carrying around wooden sculptures of Jesus and the Virgin. They go to all the twelve churches of the old town, singing out loud gloomy and sorrowful hymns in Latin. They walk all day by foot, in penance.
It’s a day of great spiritual involvement for everyone, even for non believers like me.
This is one of the few places where these timeless and ancient traditions are still on, unchanged. And if it wasn’t for their sneakers, their smartphones and their sunglasses, it would be really hard to tell in which year you’re in.

Photo reportange: Milan

I spent some beautiful days in Milan last week.
I didn’t know the city, as I hadn’t been there before, but I loved its coherence and its contradictions from the first moment: elegance, style and subtle religiousness, avant-garde and tradition, noise and silence. This is what Milan gave me.
I wanted to improve my street photography skills, and show things as I was experiencing them.
Here you can see some photos I took with my invisible compact camera.

The colour of sun and wheat

As a wedding photographer, there’s one thing that I notice every time I step into a church: tones and colours. 
Here in Denmark there’s a lot of white and grey, sometimes blue tiles, sometimes red bricks, and a lot of dark wood: usually, the atmosphere is quite cold.
In the warm south of Europe the dominant colour is yellow. The colour of sun and wheat.
Where I am from, it’s very common to find old buildings made of tuff: palaces and churches with big, rough, porous bricks. It looks like a soft sponge that you can squeeze. 
In some other areas, like in Sicily, the most common rock is yellow marble.
These rocks contribute to give your photos a sense of warmth that you couldn’t achieve otherwise.
And as a wedding photographer, that’s very important.

Old places, new eyes

Someone says traveling is that thing that leaves you speechless and then turns you into a storyteller. 

We think we know our own home land by heart: we believe that we know every place, that we’ve seen everything there’s to see. Sometimes, we think there isn’t much worth a visit.
So I wasn’t super excited today when I went with some friends to visit the Abbey of Santa Maria of Pulsano, a shrine on the mountain, founded in the 6th century.
I had promised myself not to take my camera with me, to take a real break, but I couldn’t help it, and put my Canon into my backpack.
And then something happened: I began seeing old places with new eyes.
Suddenly I noticed the astonishing view, the beautiful church built in a cave, the breathtaking paths to the caves used by the hermit monks. I was excited like a kid, as my friends in Copenhagen know: they got ALL THE PHOTOS on snapchat :)