Making decisions

Yesterday I met a couple getting married next year, to talk about their wedding photos. It was our first meeting, so we talked a bit of what we do and what we like, and I explained them why I love shooting weddings: because it’s very challenging. 
During a wedding you have no control over the location, the weather, the light, the rain, the mood, the development of the event. You can’t decide where and when to take photos: if it’s outdoor and in bright sun, you’ll just have to adjust to that. You can’t waste time deciding what to do, or you’ll miss the moment, and the “moment” is the very core of wedding photography. 
It’s a matter of making decisions as fast as possible.
This picture I’m showing you was taken in very poor light conditions: there was no direct light on the couple and - stupid me - I didn’t have the time to go get my flash and put it on my camera. It was so dark that my camera had issues with the focus. Luckily for me, my camera can deal pretty well with high ISO, so the only option was: high ISO, combined with the largest aperture possible. 
There.

Fairy tales

“In the land that created fairy tales, we just started our own” 
Cit. Rufus Gifford

We all know it: Denmark was the first country in the world to allow gay couples to formalise their unions, in 1989. Today, most of the battles have been won here, and LGBT couples can have equal rights. They even have the blessing of the Danish Church.
I was born in a small catholic town in south of Italy, and after 4 years in Copenhagen it still feels amazing to have this freedom and acceptance. Working as a wedding photographer in Scandinavia I have seen that people look at gay weddings for what they really are: celebrating couples committed to one another. That’s it.
I must say, never in my life in Italy I would have imagined to experience this sense of inclusion, and also to be the one documenting it with my camera.
It really feels amazing to be part of it.

Ritual

The tradition of the wedding cake comes from ancient Rome, where guests used to break a loaf of bread over the bride’s head for fertility’s sake.

I am not really a cake person, I’d rather have a sandwich. 
Every time I shoot a wedding though, I eat a slice of the wedding cake: its flavour has been chosen among many, its design meticulously selected, and the pastry chef carefully picked. 
It’s not just a cake, it’s a wedding cake. It's a ritual itself. It’s a piece of art. 
Therefore it is a very important detail of the whole wedding day, as much as the bride’s dress. 
So next time you see a wedding cake, think of how much thought and work were put into it.
And then, only then, taste it.